SteadyOptions is an options trading forum where you can find solutions from top options traders. TRY IT FREE!

We’ve all been there… researching options strategies and unable to find the answers we’re looking for. SteadyOptions has your solution.

Portfolio Protection Utilizing Calendar Spreads


Calendar Spreads (including diagonals and ratios) can be a very effective method to “hedge” a portfolio. However, it is not without some complexities.Understanding the Theory and Methodology is important to achieve one’s intended result. In essence, one must understand the whys as well as the hows or they will continuously be faced trying to resolve dilemmas along the way.

The Theory is pretty easy to understand. It is backed up by mounds of statistical proofs and observations. Advanced math skills are not necessary.  It is really borne out of two separate but interrelated concepts …  1) Market Performance and  2) Individual Performance. Let’s take a look at these two elements:

 

Market Performance:

A statistical proof exists; separate from data collection or observation, that indicates the market should have an upward bias (or positive skew). Observations and data, collected over the last 100 years confirm this to be true.  It is noteworthy that the data confirms the theory and not the other way around. One doesn’t need a statistics degree to confirm this … they need only look at any long term chart and they can easily see that the market is an ever upward climb.

 

Of course it has it “fits and spurts” but the upward bias is obvious to all that take the time to look.Though there is some discussion of how large this skew is, most studies indicate that the market is up 60% to 70% of the time. This seems to hold true when viewed over decades, years, month, weeks and even days.

 

Individual Performance

This is a little bit trickier to explain … but I’ll do my best.  First, we must differentiate between the “trader”, the “market timer” and the long term investor. There have been many studies of professional money managers and individual investors that differ somewhat in their quantitative results but agree in the overall result … most investors (pros and DIY) underperform a simple buy and hold of abroad market index. Furthermore, this underperformance is not small … in some studies is as much as 5% per year in the short term, and even more in the long term

 

Time Period (ending Dec. 31, 2014)

Average Equity Fund Investor Return

S&P 500 Average Return

5 years

10.19%

15.45%

10 years

5.26%

7.67%

20 years

5.19%

9.85%

30 years

3.79%

11.06%

 

Simply put: The most effective investment strategy is “buy and hold” but few actually accomplish this end. The reason seems to be pretty simple … the average investor is driven “emotionally” not logically.Every seasoned investor has experienced this  ... or they are kidding themselves. No one … yes, no one … is immune.


Additionally, asset allocations such as the most popular 60%/40% stocks/bonds are widely recommended. Contrary to this, the data indicates that the most effective allocation is actually 100% stocks. By example, if we took the Five Year results from the above chart we would have a 10% Equity return. But if one was, say 60% in stocks, the equity return as a percentage of their portfolio is closer to 6%.  So, on a portfolio basis they are not achieving anywhere near the 10% return. Contrast that with over 15% had they just simply put all their assets into an index fund and not engaged in any trading activity.


Of course, very few investors will accept this because of the risk of loss in down years (we all remember 2008). But, once again, the path is clear … it is the emotional courage that is at issue. Even the worst of down years are regained in a couple of years. Nonetheless, investors seem willing to accept less than optimal returns in exchange for some degree of safety.

 

Calendar Option Theory

Let me be emphatic that this conversation is about utilizing calendar spreads as an adjunct to or as a core position. It is not targeting “one-off” trades”. That’s for another day.


So, this brings us full circle to the theory behind calendar spreads (and most hedges, for that matter).  Investors should seek out ways to be fully invested and also limit their downside risk.  The theory is based, mostly, upon the fact that most investors would have increased PORTFOLIO returns if they abandoned traditional asset allocation mixes (such as 60%/40%) and, instead put 100% of their portfolio in an index fund and bought a far dated put to protect the downside.


It is so with calendar spreads. One can expand their allocation towards equities, and away from bonds, while protecting against loss.


Of course, the far dated put detracts from returns, but the ability to be 100% equity invested, the ability to have a cap on the downside (usually less than 5%/year) will enable the investor to outperform traditional asset allocations and … most importantly … enable them to avoid panic and emotional selling.


Now, with this theory behind us, let’s look at calendar spread methodology.

 

Methodology

First the time to employ a calendar spread is during a rising market (or at least a flat market) when volatility is average or lower. This is common sense. The far-darted long put wants to be bought at the most economical price and lower volatility lowers the cost. Not rocket science.


Next, and the more difficult part, is the setting of the near--dated put-write. This is complicated because one needs to consider the strike; the expiry; and when to roll. So let me give some guidelines.

 

Strike

One can “play around” and try to guess the market and go ITM, ATM or OTM as they please. My personal experience and the rather dismal track record for “market timers” would discourage this in favor of a more systematic approach. This approach would be based upon the concept that the market has upward skew. It is also aided by the fact that the downside is limited and protected by virtue of the long, far dated put.

 

That being the case, the put-write strike should be as deep ITM as practical. Simply stated, it replaces a long equity position. The further ITM it is placed, the closer it comes to mimicking a long equity position.


Remember: One sells a near-dated put instead of an outright buy of the underlying, to try to capture extrinsic with the hopes that it will offset the cost of the far-dated.


There aren’t a lot of studies that would indicate how DITM it should be set, but if done as a monthly strike, 2% seems to be confirmed in at least one study. But before someone hops on that, we need to look at what is the best expiry.

 

Expiry:

When one sells a DITM put, it favors selling shorter durations provided the move --- in the direction of the strike --- does not exceed TWICE the premium collected. This is true whether one is comparing a weekly to a two-week; a weekly to a monthly; or a monthly to a quarterly; or even a weekly to a leap. So, if one sold a near-term put and received, say, $5 in premium … the near term is favored over any far-dated, provided the underlying doesn’t rise more than twice ($10) the premium received.

 

Strike and Expiry

Unfortunately, this is sort of a balancing act and there is no definitive study that helps us out. Combining the two elements, my experience is that selling a weekly 1% ITM is the right level. However, that holds only on an underlying with a Beta of 1 (SPX). If the underlying Beta is, say, 1.5, then the strike should be 1.5% ITM …and so on.


The 1% ITM shows gains in and of itself and compared to a further-dated as long as the weekly move is less than 2% up. Now, there will be times that the move is greater than 2%up. This will happen, on average, 4 times a year.  But the frequency of large up moves may be offset by “Holding the Strike”.

 

Holding the Strike

This is the most important part of selling puts (calendar spreads or naked puts). If there is a drop, do NOT lower the strike and try to capture more extrinsic. Always be willing to sacrifice extrinsic on a down move in order to be prepared for the inevitable bounce back up. It may come in a week; a month; or a year. But the market, historically and scientifically has always (yes, ALWAYS) rebounded.


The real danger to a calendar spread is losing short term value on a big move down and then not fully regaining it on a bounce (the “whip-saw”) Always keep in mind that the far-dated protects the downside … “holding the strike” protects against the “whip-saw”.


Additionally, many times a big up move will follow a down move. So, holding the strike will reduce the frequency of being over-run.


Combining these three ingredients, one should sell the short put on a weekly basis; the greater of 1% ITM or the previous strike.

 

Rolling the PUT

As long as the PUT is ITM, it is best to hold till expiry to maximize theta decay.

 

However there will be times when one sets the strike 1% ITM on Friday and on Monday the market moves up 1%. What to do? Will the market drop by week’s end? Or, will it continue up?


There is no answer. The market will do what the market will do. History tells us that it is 60-40 going to go up. That may be sufficient reason to raise the strike. Even if the strike holds, you would have raised it another 1% on expiry under a normal roll, so at worst, you’re doing it a little early. Rolling up ½% now would be a cautious minimum.


A greater dilemma occurs if the move is greater than 1% early in the week and you’re now OTM. If a strike is over-run and then rolled up, you incur a permanent loss of some amount. However, I’d consider rolling up on the basis that even if there is a drop down, theprevious level will be regained.

 

Knee-Jerk or Fundamental

With all that said it is worthwhile to evaluate the character of any big move. Is it knee-jerk or fundamental? Has something changed or is it concern over the possibility that something may change?  Every investor needs to consider these factors. If there is a fundamental deterioration in the economy, then one might want to be somewhat more defensive on the near-term put-write. My best advice is to make any such determination carefully and don’t be afraid of getting there a little late. The far-dated put protects. So it is never an issue of suffering large losses, it is more about possibly making money during the bear, while others lose money.

 

Summary

Calendar spreads bring with them problems that all investors must face … what to do? These guidelines can resolve what to do on a down move… Hold The Strike. What is so simple in a calendar spread is usually the most difficult decision investors using traditional methods face.

 

These guidelines also resolve what to do on more modest moves (less than 1%/week). Stay the course.


Over-runs are more problematic. They resemble the issues that traditional investors face on up moves. Is it going further or is it coming down? The only way to fully resolve this is to make a determination as to whether it is a knee jerk or fundamental move.


However, absent clear signals that a fundamental change has taken place … be willing to err by adjusting on the side of the market going up, even more.


Ken Reel is a well known and respected Seeking Alpha Contributor with over 100 articles. He has worked in the financial service industry for 40 years. Ken's area of expertise is risk management and complex financial products. He has been a frequent speaker, on behalf of many financial firms, to financial professionals across the country. He has extensive experience in statistics and actuarial science.

What Is SteadyOptions?

Full Trading Plan

Complete Portfolio Approach

Diversified Options Strategies

Exclusive Community Forum

Steady And Consistent Gains

High Quality Education

Risk Management, Portfolio Size

Performance based on real fills

Try It Free

Non-directional Options Strategies

10-15 trade Ideas Per Month

Targets 5-7% Monthly Net Return

Visit our Education Center

Recent Articles

Articles

  • What’s Wrong With Your 401(k)? (If anything)

    There currently are over sixty million Americans that are active 401(k) participants, and well over 500,000 total active 401(k) plans offered by employers in the United States.  Despite these high numbers, usages could be higher, as the US Census Bureau estimates that only 41% of all employees with access to a 401(k) plan utilize it, with even less funding it fully.

    By cwelsh,

    • 0 comments
    • 90 views
  • Upcoming Decay of Options

    I am on the hunt for a short volatility position for three main reasons. First, the market’s wild swings have, for the time being at least, diminished. Second, option activity has dried up as my options barometer continues to be stuck in the 4 – 6 range as traders are not making big bets in either direction.

    By Jacob Mintz,

    • 0 comments
    • 150 views
  • The Scientific Process of Increasing Expected Returns

    For many US investors, the "base case" for equity investing is US large cap stocks, most commonly benchmarked as the S&P 500. You could absolutely do far worse than owning these 500 great US companies, and the weight of the evidence suggests that most actively managed mutual funds that benchmark themselves against the S&P 500 index have in fact done worse.

    By Jesse,

    • 0 comments
    • 290 views
  • Those Golden and Death Crosses

    The use of moving average (MA) for predicting future price behavior must be undertaken cautiously. MA is a lagging indicator, so the question must be: Can a lagging indicator provide guidance for the future? Yes. The use of two MA lines and how they interact is a reliable form of reversal indicator.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 265 views
  • Trading Reverse Iron Condors When IV Is Elevated

    Our members know that pre earnings straddles and calendars have been our bread and butter strategies in the recent years. We enter those trades when the prices are cheap compared to previous cycles. However, in the last few months of 2018, Implied Volatility exploded, making most of those trades too expensive.

    By Kim,

    • 0 comments
    • 304 views
  • How To Short Volatility The Right Way

    Shorting volatility in 2017 was easy money. In fact, it was easy money every year since 2010 when iPath S&P 500 VIX Short Term Futures TM ETN (NYSEARCA:VXX) has been created. Just go short VXX, buy puts or put debit spreads, and you would make money every year since 2010.

    By Kim,

    • 11 comments
    • 871 views
  • Leveraged Anchor Implementation

    This week Steady Options implemented the newest iteration of the Anchor trades – the Leveraged Anchor. This will now officially be tracked. We will also continue to track the Traditional Anchor as well. It is our belief that the Leveraged Anchor will perform better, on a risk adjusted basis than Anchor has, particularly on the upside of the trade.

    By cwelsh,

    • 0 comments
    • 777 views
  • 2018: A Year To Remember

    Making money in the stock market in 2017 was easy. Pick almost any stock or index. Buy calls. Sell put credit spreads. Almost any bullish or slightly bullish strategy would work. Everyone was a genius trader. Then came 2018. US stocks posted its worst year in a decade. Volatility exploded. 

    By Kim,

    • 0 comments
    • 527 views
  • SteadyOptions 2018 - Year In Review

    2018 marks our seventh year as a public service. It was an excellent and exciting year. We closed 124 winners out of 161 trades. Our model portfolio produced 129.5% compounded gain on the whole account based on 10% allocation per trade. The winning ratio was 77.0%. We had only one losing month in 2018. 

    By Kim,

    • 0 comments
    • 1,215 views
  • Systematic vs. Discretionary Trading

    Much of the discussion in finance is about "active" vs. "passive". Active management typically uses security selection and/or market timing to make portfolio management decisions. Passive management typically does not, instead, focusing on market risk premiums as the source of expected return. So which is better?

    By Jesse,

    • 0 comments
    • 611 views

  Report Article

We want to hear from you!


Wow - this article is worth the full membership fee of SO and its offered for free too. Thank you so much - my main portfolio has been consistently long - last three years aggressively so even. The problem of a real major draw down is that on a leveraged option long portfolio like mine you can lose 60% or even 80% but hedging is expensive and really bites you. Timing it - been there - always get it wrong. I have used collars likewise with mixed success but generally poor results.

 

Only issues I see are that where obviously the market doesnt fall up - but in a week a 10% drop can occur - the author is correct that the long put protects but being of lower delta this can still cause a momentary cash crunch need to buy back the short option, this is the only problem I see during a black swan. The only other practical issue is how to calculate the beta of a diversified long option portfolio like mine - still a really excellent system. I shall look to implement this.Otherwise this looks very interesting.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

A big drop, such as 10% or more, starts balancing things out.  For instance if the long SPY positions dropped 10% today, delta would be .22.  So the longs would gain 80% for a 100% loss on the shorts.

 

In practice, the worst drops are the 3% or so that stay down for a month, so you realize the loss, but don't gain very much on the longs.  Then the market goes back up, then repeats that.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

19 hours ago, cwelsh said:

A big drop, such as 10% or more, starts balancing things out.  For instance if the long SPY positions dropped 10% today, delta would be .22.  So the longs would gain 80% for a 100% loss on the shorts.

 

In practice, the worst drops are the 3% or so that stay down for a month, so you realize the loss, but don't gain very much on the longs.  Then the market goes back up, then repeats that.

 

The article sounds very well to me that am very interested in all hedging strategies, specially now with a market cycle very advanced.

Beg your pardon but I cannot see the hedging power of a delta positive bull calendar. The strategy after all, will gain in upwards market drifts, and lose if dropping, so adding insult to injury.

I have done a quick test with SPX in a harsh period, but no the worst at all (Jan 2018), and as expected, losses of this calendar are staggering.

Of course after years of running, as any bull position, the overall positive market tendency will turn the balance, but it is devastating with a market plummeting. In short time, long leap puts will not cover short losses if dropping, to partially mitigate the rest of your portfolio loss .

Understand that leap long put strike is the same as short one, at least for the first shot (calendar), and then You only roll the shorts, holding the strike if market drop and 10% up if raise.

 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Javier said:

Understand that leap long put strike is the same as short one

Not what I understood - the LEAP or longer option is further OTM - it is the short one that is ITM

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, TrustyJules said:

Not what I understood - the LEAP or longer option is further OTM - it is the short one that is ITM

I was wondering the same.  An example would be helpful.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Javier said:

 

 

The article sounds very well to me that am very interested in all hedging strategies, specially now with a market cycle very advanced.

Beg your pardon but I cannot see the hedging power of a delta positive bull calendar. The strategy after all, will gain in upwards market drifts, and lose if dropping, so adding insult to injury.

I have done a quick test with SPX in a harsh period, but no the worst at all (Jan 2018), and as expected, losses of this calendar are staggering.

Of course after years of running, as any bull position, the overall positive market tendency will turn the balance, but it is devastating with a market plummeting. In short time, long leap puts will not cover short losses if dropping, to partially mitigate the rest of your portfolio loss .

Understand that leap long put strike is the same as short one, at least for the first shot (calendar), and then You only roll the shorts, holding the strike if market drop and 10% up if raise.

 

Where did you see mentioning of delta positive bull calendar? He is talking about calendars as a general name  (including diagonals and ratios) as mentioned in the first sentence. This specific technique is very similar to what we do in Anchor.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please, give me an example. Assume SPX @2000 and You want to set it up Today.

Jules if the leap is OTM even worse, more delta positive.

Edited by Javier

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy and free!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

Options Trading Blogs