SteadyOptions is an options trading forum where you can find solutions from top options traders. TRY IT FREE!

We’ve all been there… researching options strategies and unable to find the answers we’re looking for. SteadyOptions has your solution.

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Yesterday
  3. Last week
  4. Actually, scratch that @Djtux I realized that I just asked for the currently existing and fully featured Scanner. *face palm*
  5. Ah right. I've been using the left hand table as a 'paste into my watchlist' to figure out what was confirmed. Is there any feasibility to have the left chart store until they're past the announcement (or a separate table for all currently confirmed?) If it simplifies the feature only symbol, earnings date and earning time are useful; I dont need the confirmation date.
  6. anand331

    Brokers and commissions

    Yes. I called Tradier and they said there are some issues. They expect to be resolved shortly (I have worked in technology so know that shortly could be anything).
  7. rigulator

    Brokers and commissions

    Not able to set up the NKE trade anymore, no matter if I use ONE, Tradehawk or website.
  8. CJ912

    Brokers and commissions

    Suffering from some issues with Tradier. Anyone else?
  9. Djtux

    volatilityhq.com Official Thread

    The earning date feed only stores 3 weeks of confirmation history. I know there are some limitations.
  10. gf58

    Member of the Month

    Thank you very much Kim 😁 Ive learnt so much from all members of the community and am proud that others have been able to get value from my own learning process. I may have said it before but the strength of SO is the depth of the community. The trades from you and @Yowster are invaluable for learning how to trade an options portfolio and the deeper understanding comes from the questions that arise. On many occasions I've seen other members ask the same question that Im scratching my head about and the replies from everyone express and openness and expertise that you wouldnt find any in many other places; everyone just wants to help where they can! Thankyou Kim and Yowster for bringing us together and that you everyone for making it such a great place to be. NB. Thankyou @Ringandpinion for the cool nickname! All for one and one for all. Very apt to describe SO!
  11. @Djtux I noticed that FDX have confirmed their earnings but they are missing from the earning dates feed....not sure but I could have sworn I'd seen it in the list last week.
  12. TrustyJules

    Member of the Month

    Wow the illustrious company I find myself in as well as your kind words mean a lot - there is no greater recognition than that of your peers. Particularly as some rather nasty day jon related stuff has kept me from investing - no pun intended - as much time as I would like in SO. Thank you all and thank you @Kim.
  13. Rebeker

    Clarification on exercise and assignment

    Old thread but I just needed it.
  14. Djtux

    volatilityhq.com Official Thread

    I can that too to the todo list, it's definitely doable. I don't think it's possible to do what you suggest with the 'back' button. The only possibility is to force the browser to open a new window when you left click a hyperlink.
  15. Michael C. Thomsett

    Cyclical versus Historical Volatility

    In this belief system, historical volatility is backward-looking and refers strictly to the price behavior of the underlying. Implied volatility is an estimate of the option premium’s future degree of movement (without knowing whether it will increase or decrease). It is based on application of known and unknown factors. The parametric version of historical volatility involves developing a series of assumptions about returns based on how price has behaved in the past. A non-parametric version is based on direct observation of recent price changes, without applying any other assumptions about future behavior. The often cited rule that “past returns do not reflect future returns” is part of the development of historical volatility. The two versions above can be combined as a form of hybrid analysis. However, both are based on recent prices and involve specific and known outcomes. Implied volatility relies on estimates of future option premium behavior and is not based directly on historical changes. However, known past volatility is likely to influence the assumptions applied to develop the estimate. Implied volatility is intended to predict and is based on the controversial Black-Scholes pricing model. This model contains numerous flaws, the greatest of which is implied volatility and the methods for arriving at its assumptions. But there is more. Most traders do not consider cyclical volatility in attempts to pin down likely future premium movement. In fact, beyond variance over time, in one important respect, volatility is predictable. One profound observation revealed that when it comes to how price behaves, “large changes tend to be followed by large changes- of either sign – and small changes tend to be followed by small changes.” [Mandelbrot, Benoit (October 1963). The Variation of Certain Speculative Prices. The Journal of Business, Volume 36, No. 4, pp. 394-419] This claim aids in identifying not only potential returns from options trading, but also of risks involved. The magnitude of price movement in the direct and immediate past is a predictor of how it is likely to behave in the future (although direction of movement cannot be known). Traders seeking low risk should therefore select options on underlyings with low historical volatility; and those willing to behave more speculatively may seek out options whose underlying has been much higher in historical volatility. In both cases, the most recent data are going to yield the most reliable analysis. Because historical volatility is easily identified, it is a sensible starting point for articulating cyclical volatility. Few underlying issues are consistent in their historical price behavior. Therefore, the most recent trends are most useful. This claim that large or small changes are likely to indicate future movement, should be apparent once it is expressed. Even so, options traders are not always likely to apply this observation in selecting one option trade over the other. It might not even be used to select a strategy at any moment. When a favorite underlying has exhibited low volatility, this may be sed to select a list of strategies that are appropriate, given the trader’s risk tolerance. Likewise, when volatility has been high recently, it may indicate a completely different list of possible strategies. When volatility changes dramatically, it could also be used to signal the timing of entering no new trades or closing current trades. This risk analysis is perhaps among the most useful traders can use to manage market risks for options. This explains use of the term “cyclical” in describing volatility. It is the most recent trend toward higher or lower volatility in the underlying. This directly affects option premium values, but because no form of volatility provides information about the direction of changes, it is limited to an understanding of the changes in risk and return. This is extremely valuable information, and it adds context to the observation of historical volatility levels. It makes the analysis not only sensitive to time, but also to how risks change as volatility adjusts. Can the same cyclical approach be used to estimate implied volatility? To a degree it can, but because IV is always an assumption, the most sensible method for cyclical analysis would be to base future estimates on historical option pricing. In other words, the degree of risk in implied volatility may be based on price changes in the option itself. This is a form of option-based historical volatility. It is complicated, however, because time decay distorts and determines volatility, notably as expiration approaches. The sensible determination of cyclical implied volatility would have to be based on past option volatility as specific moments. For example, selecting times to expiration (4, 3, or 2 weeks, for example), how has one option behaved compared to another. Applying identical assumptions of implied volatility, how accurate have these been in understanding premium movement? This becomes difficult to apply, because – as options traders know – the behavior of one option is different than that of another, even given the same circumstances and timing. For these reasons, a starting point of cyclical analysis is more sensible based on the underlying in the moment. A comparison between several underlying issues and the historical volatility of each will indicate the recent and current volatility (risk) levels and help traders to improve their selection of underlying securities and option strategies. The intention in implied volatility has always been to accurately estimate future volatility levels, but the reliance on this estimate is flawed and not as reliable as traders would wish. However, when the analysis is based on cyclical historical volatility of the underlying, risks are better understood. It makes sense when recalling the nature of options. They are called derivatives because they are derived from price movement in the underlying (historical volatility). Overlaying the cyclical component improves the application of volatility in selection of both the underlying and the option strategy. Michael C. Thomsett is a widely published author with over 80 business and investing books, including the best-selling Getting Started in Options, coming out in its 10th edition later this year. He also wrote the recently released The Mathematics of Options. Thomsett is a frequent speaker at trade shows and blogs on his website at Thomsett Publishing as well as on Seeking Alpha, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. Related articles Implied Volatility Collapse Pricing Models and Volatility Problems Types of Volatility Fundamental Volatility and Stock Prices How to Trade Options Volatility Volatility During Crises How To Profit From A Volatile Market
  16. Kim

    Break even - Options

    Break even means the same as for the stock prices - the price is the same as your purchase price. P.S. Don't assume that "as soon as the stock goes up by couple cents, options turn green and you start to make money". This will depend on how fast the stock goes up, Implied Volatility etc. If the stock goes up, IV can decrease and you can still lose money. If it goes up not right away but after few days, the negative theta will negatively impact the options price. There are many factors involved here.
  17. greywolf85

    Break even - Options

    Hey there, I'm kind of a new Options Trader and wanted to know what actually is the "Break Even" price is. I'm only asking because as soon as the stock goes up by couple cents, options turn green and you start to make money. Could someone explain if I'm missing something?
  18. FrankTheTank

    Member of the Month

    Wow. Thank you so much. This really means a lot to me. I feel guilty taking the money as I learn so much here so I am going to donate it to a local charity here in Charlotte where I live.
  19. Ringandpinion

    Member of the Month

    I heartily agree. I'm digging through their old posts constantly, learning more each time. And thank you @Kim for picking all three, I wouldn't have been able to pick just one between them.
  20. Kim

    Member of the Month

    So.. it's the end of the month, time for a decision. Since this is our first award, we have to take into account contribution of the last few months, not only one month. And this time it will be not one member but three.. surprise surprise.. The award goes to The Three Musketeers ( @gf58, @TrustyJules, @FrankTheTank) Thank you for your contributions, we all appreciate it very much!!
  21. I think I understand what you're looking for. If you clear out the start date, and set it to, sa, 2017-01-01, you'll see a chart with all the RV lines for each earnings date since then. RV being defined as price of the ATM straddle divided by the ATM strike, the RV chart simply plots the RV at the end of each day. The T-n values n the X-axis show you how many days prior to the earnings release each particular day was. Double-clicking a particular line removes all other lines, allowing you to focus on that particular earnings cycle. Double-click again, and the chart is restored.
  22. I am trying to get the RV chart of IBM trade from Oct 8,2020. This is my settings on ChartAffair.com (remember i am trying to use it for the first time)
  23. The RV charts do, in fact, only show historical data. If you're seeing a "Mean" line, it means there's already a range f data it's working with. Make sure the start date is a couple of years in the past. Post a picture in case this doesn't help.
  24. @Christof+ Is it possible to view RV chart for old trades? I tried to set the startdate few months back but i can only see the mean line. -R
  25. zxcv64

    volatilityhq.com Official Thread

    @Djtux, following on from Frank's request, mine's is on the same Return Scanner. When I am on page 2 (or any page > 1) and I click on one of the hyperlink numbers, I am quite rightly taken to the Return Matrix page for that stock. However, when I press the 'back' arrow, I am always taken pack to page 1 of the Return Scanner. Is it possible to be returned to the same page that we are in when we called the Return Matrix? Or, if it's easier, then when we click on one of the hyperlink numbers, then open a new window, rather than show the Return Matrix in the same window as where the user current is??
  26. Investopedia defines paper trading as "a simulated trade that allows an investor to practice buying and selling without risking real money. While learning, a paper trader records all trades by hand to keep track of hypothetical trading positions, portfolios, and profits or losses. Today, most practice trading involves the use of an electronic stock market simulator, which looks and feels like an actual trading platform. Most brokers allow to open a paper (simulated) account where all trades can be simulated. It also can be done using an options trading software such as ONE, or simply by writing down all trades by hand. Here is the summary of the pros and the cons of paper from few different sources. The Pros No Risk: It costs nothing, and you can't lose money with bad decisions or poor timing. No Stress, no emotions of greed and fear. The trader can focus fully on the process, not the emotions. Practice: The trader gains experience in every element of the trading process, from pre-market preparation to final profit or loss taking. Confidence: Making a series of complex decisions that gets rewarded with hypothetical profits goes a long way in building the novice's confidence so that they can do the same thing when real money is at stake. Statistics: Paper trading for several weeks up to a month builds useful statistics about the new strategy and market approach. The Cons Slippage and Commissions: Real money traders deal with all sorts of hidden costs from slippage and commissions. Usually it's not realistic to get filled at the mid, so the results of paper trading might be skewed. Emotional Reality: Paper trading doesn't address or evoke real-world emotions produced by actual profits or losses. Controlling emotions in the market is hard. If you only focus on the money, you have the wrong mindset.” The game only becomes real when you have "skin in the game" Formfitting: Paper traders pick out ideal entries and exits, missing the minefield of obstacles generated by the modern computer-driven environment. What Our Members Say Here are some selected comments from our members, taken directly from the forum: I have found real trading sharpens the mind; the learning happens a lot faster with real money. Also, with trading real money, you get a much better appreciation with how fills work. Paper trading fills are nothing like they are in real life. Paper trading is really good to get to know and more deeply understand the strategy but it doesn't fully simulate all (especially psychological) aspects of live trading, net net I see a valuable place for both. A key element is effective learning/maximizing the pace of learning. In the context of maximizing learning paper trading has a clear place in developing the 'muscle memory' of the trade execution. In a paper context you can focus on entering, monitoring and exiting in a safe space (without the psychological highs and lows). Many books and people I've read suggest paper trading for at least 6 months before putting real money on this business also, read as much as you can because knowledge is your main advantage in this game. I am not interested in devoting the time to paper trade and can't sustain ongoing losses plus fees. The point with paper trading is to understand the strategies, see how a trade evolves day by day, see how the adjustments impact the trades etc... IMO, focusing on paper trade fills vs live fills is missing the point of it. My Take The goal of paper trading is not to see if the trade is profitable or not. It's mostly to "feel" the strategy and follow the dynamics. When trading a new strategy, most traders will make mistakes, no matter how experienced they are. Those mistakes might include things like forgetting closing the trade before earnings, missing the adjustment or the closing notification etc. When you jump with real money right away, those mistakes might become very expensive. I can definitely see and understand both sides of the argument, but just to clarify: my recommendation applies to ALL members, novices and experienced. The reason is simple: for most traders those strategies will be fairly new, even if they have years of trading experience. It's like changing specialty in medicine - even if you are a very experienced doctor, a new specialty always presents new challenges. Here is an example from just few weeks ago. We had a new member who claimed to have 10+ years of experience. He jumped into one of the straddles on his second day. He did not read the strategy overview and relied on the trade notification to close it. He did not read the discussion topic, and not surprisingly (since he also didn't read his welcome email), he also didn't know that he needed to follow the trade topic to get the closing notification. Well, you probably guessed where does it end - he held the trade through earnings, the stock didn't move and the straddle lost around 60%. There are many moving parts in those strategies, and even experienced traders need some time to learn them. Paper trading simply prevents you to lose money if you make a mistake (and most traders will). Summary This is taken from one of the options trading mentoring programs website: Plan on at least six to twelve months of paper trading and live trading to get to break even. Once you are not losing money, you can slowly start scaling your trading size up. Your doctor, attorney or pilot all started by hitting the books and then getting instruction from a current and qualified professional to teach them their trade. It is no different with option trading. It's a complicated skill set that needs a good amount of understanding before you start trading live. I guess I'm not the only one advocating this approach. The bottom line is: while paper trading has its limitations, both trading and emotional, I still recommend doing it, and many traders come to realize its benefits.
  27. rigulator

    volatilityhq.com Official Thread

    @FrankTheTank @Djtux I strongly support this petition!
  1. Load more activity