SteadyOptions is an options trading forum where you can find solutions from top options traders. TRY IT FREE!

We’ve all been there… researching options strategies and unable to find the answers we’re looking for. SteadyOptions has your solution.

SteadyOptions Managed Accounts


One of the most common questions Steady Options receives relates to managed accounts. Lorintine Capital is offering managed accounts for both Anchor Trades and Steady Momentum. This post will detail the current Steady Options managed account offerings and how they work.

What is a managed account?

A managed account simply trades a set strategy on behalf of members who either do not want to trade themselves, do not have the time to trade themselves, do not understand the strategy, or who might have had issues implementing the strategy.  The managed accounts for Steady Options are offered through Lorintine Capital.  Lorintine Capital is a separate company from Steady Options.  It is a Registered Investment Advisory firm (CRD# 151204) with offices in Dallas, Texas and Gilbert, Arizona.  Lorintine Capital currently uses TD Ameritrade Institutional as its primary broker.  


Separate paperwork must be filled out to open a managed account.  All managed accounts must have investment advisory agreements with Lorintine Capital and completed brokerage account documents with TD Ameritrade Institutional (all of which can be filled out electronically and DocuSigned). 


Steady Option members in certain countries (such as Canada), may not be able to open an account.  If you live outside of the United States and wish to know if you can open an account, please email Lorintine Capital (info@lorintinecapital.com).


The brokerage account is established in the client’s name and gives the client full access to it.  This means individuals can check the balance, view all of the trades as they occur, deposit/withdraw money, and generally maintain control over the account.  If account holders decide to close the account or transfer money out of the account, we hope they communicate with us to make the process easy, but clients can always call TD Ameritrade Institutional directly and transfer the funds or close the account.Investors receive monthly statements from both TD Ameritrade Institutional and Lorintine Capital.

 

What Steady Options strategies are available for managed accounts?

There are two strategies currently available for managed accounts – the Anchor Trade Strategy and the Steady Momentum Strategy.  The core Steady Options strategy and the Creating Alpha Strategy are not available through a managed account. Members will have to continue to trade those themselves. 


The Anchor Strategy can be opened in leveraged or unleveraged form depending on each individual investors objectives and risk tolerance. The account minimum for the Anchor Strategy is $50,000, and Steady Momentum has an account minimum of $100,000.

 

How are managed accounts run (e.g. how are trades made)?

All investor accounts in each strategy are treated equally through block trading.  After the order has been filled, the position is then distributed to individual accounts based on the average fill price of executed block orders.

 

How do I open a managed account and how much do they cost?

Please email info@lorintinecapital.com to initiate the process.  There is a basic level of due diligence to ensure the investment is appropriate for your risk tolerances and current financial situation.  The typical account opening process, depending on the investors funding source and if the investor promptly returns the paperwork, takes 5-10 business days.


Fees vary by account size and by what Steady Options subscription an investor currently has.  Accounts in excess of $200,000 are charged an annualized management fee of 0.75% by Lorintine Capital and your Steady Options product specific fee is waived.  For example, if you currently subscribe to the Anchor Trades strategy for $995/year, for as long as your account remains above $200,000, that fee will be waived.  Note: this does not apply to the Steady Options bundle although the bundle fee will be discounted. 


Accounts under $200,000 are charged a Lorintine Capital management fee of 1% and Steady Options subscriptions are reduced by fifty percent (50%).


Steady Options will bill for Steady Options’ services.  Lorintine Capital’s fees will be deducted monthly directly from the TD Ameritrade Institutional account. 


For any other questions relating to managed accounts, please just reach out to anyone at Lorintine Capital or Steady Options.

Christopher B. Welsh is a SteadyOptions contributor. He is a licensed investment advisor in the State of Texas and is the president of a small investment firm, Lorintine Capital, LP which is a general partner of two separate private funds. He offers investment advice to his clients, both in the law practice and outside of it. Chris is an active litigator and assists his clients with all aspects of their business, from start-up through closing. Chris is managing the Anchor Trades portfolio.         

 

What Is SteadyOptions?

Full Trading Plan

Complete Portfolio Approach

Diversified Options Strategies

Exclusive Community Forum

Steady And Consistent Gains

High Quality Education

Risk Management, Portfolio Size

Performance based on real fills

Try It Free

Non-directional Options Strategies

10-15 trade Ideas Per Month

Targets 5-7% Monthly Net Return

Visit our Education Center

Recent Articles

Articles

  • The Minimum Effective Dose (MED) For Cash Flow Planning

    Financial planners can usually give generic advice that will be appropriate for the majority of Americans, and that’s the goal of this article. If we can get the fundamentals of cash-flow planning right (where to put your money after you earn it and pay your taxes and bills), we’re 80% of the way towards maximizing our financial situation.

    By Jesse,

    • 0 comments
    • 132 views
  • Are You Breaking Even? Or Losing?

    Among the good reasons to trade options is the need to meet or surpass your breakeven yield. This is the yield you need just to preserve your purchasing power; and it higher than most people think. In fact, most people relying on moderate to conservative yields from stocks, mutual funds, real estate and savings accounts might be earning well below this breakeven level.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 168 views
  • Buy When You Have the Money, Sell When You Need the Money

    Money can be quite an emotional topic for many of us. Emotions can enhance our experiences and relationships in many ways, but they can act as mental roadblocks especially when trying to make wise financial decisions. One of the most common emotional roadblocks I come across when working with individuals is an unwillingness to invest idle cash to meet long-term goals.

    By Jesse,

    • 0 comments
    • 406 views
  • Strategy Selection vs. Risk Management

    "A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you're talking about real money." Everett McKinley Dirksen. Let’s begin with the bottom line: When I talk to anyone about the concept of choosing an option strategy (or two) to adopt for trading, I stress that the strategy should have certain characteristics.

    By Mark Wolfinger,

    • 0 comments
    • 230 views
  • Blending Anchor Strategy

    Anchor and Leveraged Anchor investors frequently ask why the strategy only trades SPY and SPY options rather than individual stocks, other indexes or commodities. We avoid individual stocks because of tracking and divergence issues.

    By cwelsh,

    • 0 comments
    • 314 views
  • Fundamental Volatility and Stock Prices

    Every options trader must wonder whether any connection will be found between the company's fundamentals and stock prices (and in turn, option valuation as well). Because options are derived from stock price behavior, the analysis of stock movement is crucial to selecting options wisely; and that relies on volatility in the reported profit and loss over several years.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 354 views
  • Bullish Short Strangles

    A bullish short strangle sounds like a complicated strategy, but it’s really quite simple for those familiar with option terminology. A short put is combined with a short call to where the position starts with some amount of positive delta overall. This distinguishes itself from a delta neutral strangle, where both the short put and short call are sold at the same delta.

    By Jesse,

    • 5 comments
    • 564 views
  • Eight Mistakes Every Forex Trader Should Avoid

    The forex market is currently the largest financial market in the world and, due to its highly liquid nature and low barriers to entry, is only expected to grow. Becoming a forex trader requires minimal effort and with a decent internet connection, a laptop or computer, and some spare money to invest, you can start in no time.

    By Kim,

    • 0 comments
    • 436 views
  • Put/Call Parity - Two Definitions

    Put/call parity is a term options traders use to mean one of two things. The simplest definition and the one most applicable to most options traders compares the similarity in the bid/ask spread and the net debit or credit resulting from this.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 486 views
  • Put Selling: Strike Selection Considerations

    When selling puts, such as we do in our Steady Momentum PutWrite strategy, there are many questions a trader must answer: What expiration should I use? What strike should I sell? Should I choose that strike based on delta or percentage out of the money?

    By Jesse,

    • 0 comments
    • 516 views

  Report Article

We want to hear from you!


There are no comments to display.



Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account. It's easy and free!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

Options Trading Blogs