SteadyOptions is an options trading forum where you can find solutions from top options traders. TRY IT FREE!

We’ve all been there… researching options strategies and unable to find the answers we’re looking for. SteadyOptions has your solution.

Are Weekly Options a Form of Gambling?


Options traders do not have to act as gamblers … even though many do. There may be a thin line between trading and gambling, and that line is obscured when it comes to weekly options. If you utilize options to reduce risk, it is smart trading. But if you treat options trading like a bet on red or black in a roulette game, then you’re not hedging; you’re gambling.

Options, used wisely, can and do hedge market risks. Many strategies, from the basic covered call to uncovered puts, covered strangles, collars and even butterflies or condors, all can be used as risk-neutral hedging strategies. The percentages go way up in your favor when you combine conservative strategies with short-term expiration (for short positions), proximity (or underlying price to strike and of underlying price to resistance or support) and identification of reversal signals with confirmation.


That’s basically the way that options can be used to move the probabilities in your favor.


Are there differences between probabilities and odds? It’s the same thing, but gamblers like to think of winning and losing as playing the odds, and they invariably believe they can overcome the averages. Even a roulette bet on black or red, often thought of as a 50/50 bet, is not quite that favorable. With the zero and double-zero in mind, the odds of winning on a black or red bet are 47.4%, not 50%. There are 18 black, 18 red and 2 green outcomes, so black or red is an 18 out of 38 probability (18 ÷ 38 = 47.4%). This means that if you bet on either red or black consistently, you will eventually lose.


The odds are slightly better with weekly options, but it’s only a 50-50, or an even bet.

Image result for blackjack gambling


First introduced in 2005, weekly options exist for a short term only, just 8 days. They are set up every Thursday and expire the following Friday.

At first glance, weekly options are very cheap. But it could also be a sucker bet, just like the seemingly favorable rules on many casino games. For example, you can buy a weekly call option and accept the odds of the underlying price moving high enough by next Friday to make it profitable (meaning intrinsic value outpaces time decay). The same observation works for weekly puts, but in the opposite direction.


You are giving up the advantage of a longer term in exchange for a cheaper premium. But for a long position, this seems like a long shot, to use the terminology of gambling.


For short options, the odds move very nicely in favor of the trader.


Because time decay will be rapid, opening a short weekly option can be very profitable. The dollar amounts are not huge, but the annualized return can take you to double digits. In fact, on average, options lose one-third of remaining time value between the Friday before expiration and Monday. This is because three calendar days pass but only one trading day. This is a fact often overlooked by traders: Time decay takes place every day, whether the market is open or not.


This represents a great value. Going short, either with calls or puts, is a great advantage using weekly options.


A few suggestions for increasing the odds (probability) in your favor:

  1.  Build in a buffer when possible. This is a distance between the option’s strike and current price of the underlying. By keeping the position out of the money, you receive less for the position, but you also reduce exposure to exercise. As the underlying moves toward the money, the OTM call or put can be closed or rolled to avoid exercise. But there is a good chance that time decay will outpace intrinsic value.
     
  2. Pay attention to resistance and support. The most advantageous timing to open a short option is when the underlying price moves above resistance (timing to open a short call) or below support (open a short put). Assuming the price does what it usually does – retrace back into range – this timing maximizes your probability. This is especially true if the move outside of the trading range occurs with a price gap.
     
  3. Look for reversal signals and confirmation. Pay attention to traditional Western signals like double tops or bottoms or island clusters; candlesticks; volume spikes; moving average convergence; and momentum oscillators. Only act when you find the signal and confirmation; this increases your chances for success.
     
  4. Pay attention to strength or weakness in the trend. The best reversals happen when a previously strong trend reaches a plateau, slows down, and then turns in the opposite direction.

Weekly options can be summarized with the long and short attributes in mind. Long traders must fight against time decay and time. Short traders benefit from time decay and time. With the four guidelines in mind, what otherwise could be 50-50 odds are moved nicely in your favor.


Michael C. Thomsett is a widely published author with over 80 business and investing books, including the best-selling Getting Started in Options, coming out in its 10th edition later this year. He also wrote the recently released The Mathematics of Options. Thomsett is a frequent speaker at trade shows and blogs on his website at Thomsett Guide as well as on Seeking Alpha, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

What Is SteadyOptions?

Full Trading Plan

Complete Portfolio Approach

Diversified Options Strategies

Exclusive Community Forum

Steady And Consistent Gains

High Quality Education

Risk Management, Portfolio Size

Performance based on real fills

Try It Free

Non-directional Options Strategies

10-15 trade Ideas Per Month

Targets 5-7% Monthly Net Return

Visit our Education Center

Recent Articles

Articles

  • The Gut Strangle

    The graphically named “gut strangle” is a seldom-used strategy, but it might work in some circumstances. This involves trading in-the-money calls and puts. A long gut strangle is set up by buying both options; and a short gut strangle calls for selling both sides.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 18 comments
    • 375 views
  • Selling Options When Implied Volatility is High

    In the second week of October 2018, the Dow Industrial Average tumbled 1,300 points within a two-day period just ahead of earnings season. How did it happen? There were several explanations for why stock prices sold off, but the most obvious was that investor fear had changed market sentiment.

    By Nathan Wade,

    • 1 comment
    • 148 views
  • Do all stocks have the same expected returns?

    When deciding to build a diversified investment portfolio, there are many different considerations. Which asset classes do you buy? Large cap or small cap? US only, or international too? Mutual funds or ETFs? How much in bonds? Passive or active? Growth or value?

    By Jesse,

    • 0 comments
    • 197 views
  • Selling Puts: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

    Hardly a day goes by that I don't read an article or hear some pundit extol the merits of selling puts (put-write).This article will discuss various variations of put-write strategies. What accounts for put-write strategies under-performance? How to fix put-write underperformance? Why "easy money" isn't so easy.

    By Reel Ken,

    • 0 comments
    • 375 views
  • The “OOPS signal” trade

    Have you been taken by surprise by movement of your stock? Options traders who find themselves on the wrong side of a trade have experienced this dilemma, but as often as not, it occurs as part of a move and retracement.

     

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 411 views
  • 14 Tips to Better Trading from Home

    Here are 14 actionable ideas that will help you improve your trading from home. Implementing these ideas will help aspiring traders move toward the consistent profitability they seek.

    By TFCAB,

    • 0 comments
    • 7,134 views
  • Powerful Channel Signal – Combining Bollinger and T-line

    Technicians tend to focus on single indicators, such as Bollinger Bands or the t-line. These are used to attempt to perfect a timing system. Individually, each signal has merit. Combined, the reversal signal is exceptionally strong.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 6,782 views
  • Following Signs That Others Ignore (VIX Study)

    In fact, the crowd sees hardly anything out there that might end this market party.” Michael Santoli made the above statement during CNBC’s closing market wrap on January 26th, 2018. He had reason to throw caution to the wind as the S&P 500 closed the day up by more than 1%, setting another record high.

    By Michael Lebowitz,

    • 0 comments
    • 488 views
  • Revisiting Anchor Part 2

    Last month we posted some updates to the Anchor strategy that were obtained using an in-depth back testing of the strategy and variations of it using the ORATS Wheel software.  We adopted three conclusions last month:

    By cwelsh,

    • 4 comments
    • 506 views
  • Covered Calls –Does Rolling Forward Mean Higher Risk?

    Do you roll forward to avoid exercise? It seems like an obviously advantageous move. You avoid exercise and generate a net credit. What can go wrong? Actually, rolling incurs more risk, and every covered call writer needs to study the potential roll and compare the advantages of rolling versus closing and taking a loss or allowing exercise.

    By Michael C. Thomsett,

    • 0 comments
    • 652 views

  Report Article

We want to hear from you!


There are no comments to display.



Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

Options Trading Blogs