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mks212

Theta on a three day weekend

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Since the markets are closed Monday, can we expect extra theta decay today to account for the long weekend?  I have read conflicting opinions in various places.

 

Both SNDK and FFIV look like good candidates for a straddle, but 3 days of theta might change the picture.

 

Thank you.

 

Mike

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