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  3. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    Yep. That's correct. You need the following two subscriptions: 1. US Equity and Options Add-On Streaming Bundle 2. US Securities Snapshot and Futures Value Bundle NOTE: "US Securities Snapshot and Futures Value Bundle" fee is waived if monthly commissions reach 30 USD.
  4. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    When I hit run I get the "waiting for underlying symbols" Very bonehead move by me. I don't do majority of my trading on IB and the sub issue is probably what's going on here.
  5. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    Did you hit "Run" button? "Symbol ok" message is printed after you type a new Symbol, but after that you have to press Run button for the tool to actually start building RV charts. Also, from the Log page the message "Requested market data is not subscribed. Delayed market data is available." reveals what might be a problem. You need to subscribe to OPRA data for options, and to some bundle to get realtime stock quotes. As far as I remember TWS API needs special flags to work with delayed data, and chances are high ChartAffair RV Tool currently does not work with delayed data subscriptions.
  6. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    Appears it may be an issue with my subscriptions - which are you subscribed to on IB? I'll make sure it's set up correctly
  7. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    So I entered BABA, symbol ok and returns expiration dates. Thank you again @Stanislav
  8. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    "change the ticker, and will return new strikes & EA" // - do you mean the tool returns EA and a list of "Available Expiries"? ChartAffairs RV Tools asks TWS via TWS API for the list of "Available Expiries". So this part seems to be working ok. Can you please posts screenshots of what you see in Excel on a Straddle page after you change Symbol and hit Run button (and wait 1-2 minutes): 1. Screenshot of the Straddle page config area, note that tool displays current status in red (on this screenshot "Symbol ok" - this is the main diagnostics tool which reveals RV Tool's internal state): 2. Screenshot of the RV charts. 3. Screenshot of the AD4:AVxx cells: 4. And a screenshot of the Log page. This can help to diagnose the issue.
  9. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    The odd thing is I can go into the straddle tab, as an example, change the ticker, and will return new strikes & EA. So some data is coming through, but charts are not updating. On watchlist I get the text for requesting underlying price, but RV, put, call etc don't refill with anything. On the log page, I get a series of messages saying Market data farm connection is OK: "xxxxx" (X being different for each line)
  10. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Drew_Brosenhaus, try also to generate RV chart of some straddle or calendar in ChartAffair RV Tool from Straddle/Calendar pages. See if this works. Be prepared to wait a minute or two while IB returns all historical data. Also, look at Log page in ChartAffair RV Tool. Log page displays all debug messages that TWS returns when code communicates with TWS via API. This may give some clues of what is wrong. Another idea, as @Christof+ said RV Tool gets yesterdays RV data directly from chartaffairs.com web site - maybe you have some kind of firewall which blocks connections to chartaffairs.com from excel and this makes tool stuck in the middle of the process?
  11. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Stanislav strange.. I added the host, which was blank. Tried the samples and they're functioning. Still cant get it to work. I tried to open the ddedll.dll file but it comes out like a bunch of squares. My excel was 32 bit when loaded on the computer. I'll see if I can get it to 64 to check if that works. Appreciate all your help on this. ddedll.dll
  12. Kim

    Welcome to Anchor Trades

    https://steadyoptions.com/forums/forum/topic/4564-leveraged-anchor-portfolio/
  13. ramn

    Welcome to Anchor Trades

    Thanks, @Kim, I noticed that however, I am trying to find the existing all long and short positions. Please correct me if my understanding is wrong: It seems BTC FEB 10 332 P 0.70 means a BTC Jan XX 332 P was closed(long) and FEB 10 332 P was started (short). Also, are BTC and STO the only two we hedged as part of step 2?
  14. Kim

    Welcome to Anchor Trades

    Last roll was posted on Feb.6 https://steadyoptions.com/forums/forum/topic/4946-master-roll-thread/?do=findComment&comment=134655 You need to follow that topic to get the roll alerts - exactly the same way you follow the SO trades. More details: How To Use The Forum
  15. ramn

    Welcome to Anchor Trades

    thanks, I will work on Step 1 and create my portfolio. Kindly let me know what I have to do for step 2, Just to keep it simple I would hedge it for 100K even if my portfolio is little more then that. Step 2 - Fully hedge Step 3 - Earn back the cost of the hedge Also, how can I follow step 3, I joined for a few weeks now but did not get any alert or able to follow the Master roll thread posts like: https://steadyoptions.com/forums/forum/topic/4946-master-roll-thread/?do=findComment&comment=133362 https://steadyoptions.com/forums/forum/topic/4946-master-roll-thread/?do=findComment&comment=133373 Please bear with me, I am new to this but follow steadyoptions-trades were quite earlier for me since every tread is a new thread.
  16. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    Thanks, @Stanislav --Sorry for choppy response earlier. So specifically, yes, after realizing I have 32-bit excel installed on my home machine, I uninstalled 64-bit TWS and installed the 32-bit version. I am no longer receiving the .dll file error, that seems to have been solved. I installed the latest version of TWS API, even re-did it just to be sure. Followed the checklist to ensure I enabled Active X & stock clients, Port is correct. ***Host I WILL need to check when I get home. I don't recall if it was empty. I believe it was auto populated when I opened the file. I will also need to check to make sure the C:\Windows\ddedll.dl file exists -- Perhaps one of these are the issue, but I know the others were taken care of. Greatly appreciate the help, thank you.
  17. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    Are you still observing an error "The ddedll.dll file required for Excel integration is either missing or out of date"? I think your chances of receiving a meaningful answers are better if you prove slightly more info on what is going on on your system. Here are some general suggestions: - Does you TWS arch matches Excel architecture? I.e. TWS 32-bit and Excel is 32-bit. Check in Task Manager that excel.exe and javaw.exe for TWS are both 32-bit processes (or both 64-bit processes); - Did you install latest version of TWS API? Available here: https://interactivebrokers.github.io/# - Ensure that you enabled "Enable Active X and Socket Clients" in Global Configuration/API/Settings; - Check that "Socket port" in TWS settings matches port specified in Excel RV Tool; - Enter Host: 127.0.0.1 in Excel RV Tool (with this field empty the tool did not work on my machine); - Check that C:\Windows\ddedll.dl file exists (you can post here this file, so we can check what architecture this file is for); Finally, if nothing helps, look at "ActiveX Sample Spreadsheet" that comes with TWS API. Usually located here: C:\TWS API\samples\Excel\TwsActiveX.xls. Ensure it works ok. It may also worth to take a look at TwsDde.xls and/or TwsRtdServer.xls samples. Probably there are some issues on 64-bit Windows with 32-bit TWS/32-bit Excel & ddedll.dll. On my system both Excel and TWS are 64-bit applications. Everything works fine, despite the fact that C:\Windows\ddedll.dll file is for 32-bit architecture - most likely this file is not used at all when TWS/Excel are 64-bit. That is proved by the following remark from IBKR article I quoted above: So, your best bet is to switch to 64-bit Excel and 64-bit TWS. This configuration is proven to work. You can also try to close all other applications such as Chrome, VLC Player, Adobe Creative Cloud or Microsoft One Drive, as suggested in the quote above.
  18. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    So Installed proper version, still stuck on requesting underlying price when I refresh.. Went through entire checklist again and everything looks good. Any other suggestions?
  19. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    You got it.. Windows is 64 bit, but my excel 32 bit. Just checked....
  20. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Drew_Brosenhaus, see here: https://ibkr.info/node/2155 Probably your Excel and TWS architecture does not match. For example, this can be if you are using 64-bit TWS and 32-bit Excel or vice versa.
  21. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Christof+ @Stanislav Just got the error message when re-checking this morning "The ddedll.dll file required for Excel integration is either missing or out of date. The dll can be refreshed with the most up-to-date version can by downloading and installing the API Software from our web site. Please close the application and restart it after the API components have been updated." Odd because I initially got this yesterday despite downloading the API per instructions, then re-downloading, which seemed to work but I must be missing something. Not super savvy with these things, but I can go through process again and see what happened.
  22. Christof+

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Drew_Brosenhaus My experience is the same as @Stanislav's. You can compare the time needed for IB API to return historical data to the time it takes when you request a intra-day chart for an options combo in TWS. That can well take even 5 min until the chart is filled. Looks like API connections and charts get their data via the same mechanics under the hood. Yesterday's RV data directly comes from my server and should be returned very fast. It additionally gets cached in the tool.
  23. Stanislav

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Drew_Brosenhaus, on overall, IB TWS is very slow to return historical data. Looks like their architecture had been designed in 1980 and did not change since that time. So when generating Straddle/Calendar RV charts it is ok to wait a minute or sometimes even more while TWS returns all required data. As for Watchlist, I've just checked - works pretty fast. When I type a new ticker into Symbol column, the tool automatically updates expiry, RV and other info in the watchlist. Probably you tried to test this on weekends, and IB does some server maintenance on Saturdays, so TWS does not work correctly till Monday. Try again in trading hours. Also try to type a different ticker into Symbol column.
  24. Drew_Brosenhaus

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    @Christof+ Awesome tool. Thank you. I seem to have everything up and running. Request current time function works. When I hit update once on watchlist I get the requesting underlying price status, but hasn't done anything in a few minutes.. Typical? or do I have an issue?
  25. Christof+

    Free RV Real-Time Tool (with Chartaffair data)

    Thank you @Stanislav added this version to the download page
  26. Christof+

    VolatilityHQ.com vs. ChartAffair.com

    @TheBreadMaker, Just sent you a mail.
  27. Michael C. Thomsett

    Intrinsic vs. Extrinsic Value

    However, time value consists of time itself as an isolated impact on value (the closer to expiration, the more rapidly it declines). A second part of premium is extrinsic value, better known as implied volatility. Intrinsic value refers to the number of points in the money, and time value is a separate and depreciating form of premium. Intrinsic value is where all the variation takes place and where uncertainty is the primary attribute. Intrinsic value most often tracks historic value closely, and for good reason. Options, it should be remembered, are derivatives, meaning the value is derived from the underlying. For this reason, historic value is a reliable test of option value and volatility. It is reflected in implied volatility (IV), but by itself, IV is of questionable value as a means for timing trades. It can be adjusted by changing the estimates and this itself means that IV cannot be used as a firm means for option pricing or for evaluating the true volatility. Implied volatility often is given an assumed predictive quality. This is how options traders often use IV. But it is inaccurate to grant IV this value. When IV moves apart from historical volatility, it often indicates not a predictive move, but the mispricing of the option. This occurs for many reasons, but it is important to note that IV is questionable at best and inaccurate at worst. In comparison, realized volatility (movement in the underlying in response to perceived risk) is a more accurate predictive feature of the option: Implied volatility is widely believed to be informationally superior to historical volatility, because it is the “market’s” forecast of future volatility. [But this is] a poor forecast of subsequent realized volatility … Implied volatility has virtually no correlation with future volatility, and it does not incorporate the information contained in recent observed volatility. [Canina, Linda & Figlawski, Stephen (1993). The informational content of implied volatility. The Review of Financial Studies 6(3(): 659-681] The value of implied volatility is not disputed. But as an indicator of future pricing, it is not as reliable as many traders believe. Its most practical application is to make comparisons with historical volatility, whose historical and actual results are specific and accurate. When this is a method employed, it is easier to spot mispriced options than using any other method. Variations and inconsistencies between historical and implied volatility are easily spotted by means of various technical signals, such as Bollinger Bands. This indicator tracks variation outside of the standard deviations of price based on short-term price averages. This is best known as a means for timing underlying trades, but it can also be effective in identifying when options are overbought or oversold. This greatly aids ibn the timing of short-term and speculative trades based on volatility levels. Implied volatility has great value when applied in this manner, but it is a mistake to rely solely on IV without also observing how the underlying is behaving. The Bollinger Band-based test of historical volatility is expressed as price moves above or below two standard deviations from the average price. Its value is in how easily these volatility moves are seen on a chart. Options traders may immediately compare these moves above the upper band or below the lower band to option premium behavior. The approximate level of change should be similar. But when it is not (and notably when implied volatility is opposite the move in the underlying), traders have the advantage of being able to immediately exploit the mispriced option. These errors in p[ricing tend to self-correct rapidly, so immediate action is required to fully exploit the moment. This relies on the broad assumption that implied volatility has been calculated accurately, and this cannot always be known. A solution to this potential inaccuracy is to limit the comparison. When an options trader follows the underlying and the option over a period and observes consistent correlation between historical ad implied volatility, it may be assumed that the calculation of UIV is reasonable. When the correlation begins to vary, that is the moment when assumed mispricing can be seen, and trades entered. They revert quickly, and they may perform in a manner equally volatile to the original mispricing, but the point remains valid: A change in correlation is a fair indicator of a mispriced option, but without the longer-term tracking of volatility, it should not be assumed that IV is always calculated accurately. As with all timing techniques, it is the change in correlation that adds meaning, not what is seen only in the moment. Because option pricing may be affected by other influences than just volatility, the technique of timing for mispriced options relies on a belief that prices is fair and operating efficiently. Anyone who has operated in the market knows this is not always the case. The use of timing and correlation of volatility involves risk and markets are informally efficient, so options traders also need to keep an eye on influences beyond the option price and IV alone. This informational efficiency is a risk itself, because all information is given equal weight. This includes true and false information, rumor, gossip, and speculative belief. Markets are informationally efficient but the information itself may be less than accurate. This is a great flaw in the efficient market theory, and it has a direct impact on option pricing. It lacks economic efficiency, and that is what traders need to reduce market risk. As levels of IV change, so does the calculation of future IV. This makes the test of pricing even more complex. Bottom line: Correlation is reliable even when IBV is not, and the comparison is the key to better timing of trades. Michael C. Thomsett is a widely published author with over 80 business and investing books, including the best-selling Getting Started in Options, coming out in its 10th edition later this year. He also wrote the recently released The Mathematics of Options. Thomsett is a frequent speaker at trade shows and blogs on his website at Thomsett Guide as well as on Seeking Alpha, LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook. Related articles Options Trading Greeks: Theta For Time Decay Understanding Implied Volatility Powerful Channel Signal – Combining Bollinger And T-Line Few Facts About Implied Volatility
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